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Red Hat Goes To War Against VMware

RH claims OpenShift Enterprise automates much of the provisioning and systems management of the application platform stack

Red Hat put the full cavalcade of its new cloud widgetry on the market Wednesday priced at roughly a third what it would cost to use VMware, the private cloud rival Red Hat is out to unseat.

Red Hat announced the widgetry last month but it wasn’t quite ready for general availability then so it withheld pricing until now.

First comes the Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, which combines Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (good ole RHEL) with the company’s newfangled Grizzly-based OpenStack distribution in a single product aimed at advanced cloud users.

The widgetry has been optimized for deployment as either an OpenStack compute (Nova) node or as controller nodes that don’t use virtual guests.

Pricing varies with the level of support selected – either Standard (limited to business hours) or Premium (a more comforting 24x7). Annual subscriptions cost:

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform Premium: $4,499/socket-pair/year
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform Standard: $3,449/socket-pair/year
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform for Controller Nodes Premium: $2,799/socket-pair/year
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform for Controller Nodes Standard: $2,149/socket-pair/year

Red Hat says the RHEL bit underlying the cloud is unlimited.

Next comes Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure, a single subscription consisting of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization, Red Hat CloudForms and Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform that Red Hat envisions being used by organizations transitioning to a cloud-enabled architecture or beginning to build and manage a private cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) that will benefit from the monitoring and orchestration provided by CloudForms and OpenStack.

Customers will use either Red Hat virtualization managed by CloudForms or Red Hat’s OpenStack Platform on physical servers, with and without unlimited RHEL guests. Depending on the support level it will run:

  • Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure Premium: $5,999/socket-pair/year
  • Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure Standard: $4,599/socket-pair/year
  • Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure (w/o guests) Premium: $3,599/socket-pair/year
  • Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure (w/o guests) Standard: $2,799/socket-pair/year

The company says customers deploying Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization plus CloudForms today will realize a significant cost savings compared to purchasing the software separately, while getting ready for a future OpenStack deployment.

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.2 is obviously a sine-qua-non component of Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure. New third-party plug-ins will let companies like NetApp, Symantec and HP integrate their solutions directly into Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization.

Red Hat says vendors can select their own plug-in framework for added functionality.

From here on out Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization will be sold on a per-socket-pair basis and include all the capabilities of Red Hat’s desktop virtualization product. The pricing remains the same as the per-socket pricing of Red Hat’s previous Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization for Servers offering while adding its desktop virtualization features and functionality.

The new subscription is simply called Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization and guest operating systems will still need to be purchased separately.

Renewing customers will renew on the new subscription model. To wit:

  • Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Premium: $1,498/socket-pair/year
  • Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Standard: $998/socket-pair/year

Red Hat also said Wednesday that certification for its rechristened OpenStack Networking (formerly known as Quantum) and Block Storage (Cinder) is also available.

Certification means partner solutions have been tested and certified against, and integrate well with, Red Hat’s OpenStack infrastructure solutions – in other words its OpenStack Platform and Cloud Infrastructure.

As of Wednesday 592 compute nodes had been certified for Red Hat’s OpenStack Compute (Nova) and are listed in its Certified Solution Marketplace.

Separately, Red Hat has put out a new 1.2 release of OpenShift Enterprise, its private Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) widgetry that it says can be deployed in on-premise data centers or in private, public or hybrid clouds with updated pluggable technology cartridges and other enhancements.

As you may recall, there’s also a Red Hat public PaaS, OpenShift Online, making Red Hat the only enterprise software company with both public and private open source PaaS offerings.

The Enterprise version gives users access to a cloud-based application platform built on RHEL, the JBoss Enterprise Application Platform and OpenShift Origin, the upstream code that powers both OpenShift Enterprise and OpenShift Online.

Red Hat claims OpenShift Enterprise automates much of the provisioning and systems management of the application platform stack in a way that enables IT teams to meet growing business demands for new application services more easily. It also provides an on-demand, elastic, scalable and fully configured application development, testing and hosting environment so application developers can focus on coding these new application services.

With its Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) approach to handling secure multi-tenancy, OpenShift Enterprise is also supposed to provide reliable security and multi-tenancy that subdivides the operating system instances for efficiency.

OpenShift Enterprise 1.2 features include a brand new cartridge design and specification to complement the cartridge infrastructure in OpenShift. It should let OpenShift Enterprise customers and partners make additional technology services available to developers in a self-service fashion.

Last month Red Hat announced the new cartridge specification and collaboration with OpenShift ecosystem partners to enable tighter integration. Those partners included 10gen, Codenvy, Correlsense, EnterpriseDB, Iron.io, MongoLab, New Relic, OC Systems and Zend.

Besides the cartridges, OpenShift Enterprise 1.2 can create Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) sub-domains and take advantage of WebSocket for additional networking support so customers and developers can implement cloud solutions that focus on the code and accelerate their applications’ time-to-market.

OpenShift Enterprise 1.2 is immediately available in North America, the UK, continental Europe and select customers in Asia and Latin America, with plans for global availability in the coming months.

More Stories By Maureen O'Gara

Maureen O'Gara the most read technology reporter for the past 20 years, is the Cloud Computing and Virtualization News Desk editor of SYS-CON Media. She is the publisher of famous "Billygrams" and the editor-in-chief of "Client/Server News" for more than a decade. One of the most respected technology reporters in the business, Maureen can be reached by email at maureen(at)sys-con.com or paperboy(at)g2news.com, and by phone at 516 759-7025. Twitter: @MaureenOGara

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