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AWS Gets Its Own Form of Obamacare

Israeli-based Newvem can do triage, so to speak, on anybody’s Amazon installation

Israeli-based Newvem, a start-up cloud operation analytics service, can do triage, so to speak, on anybody's Amazon installation, pinpointing where the user or corporation of any size may be losing money by using the widgetry incorrectly or over-provisioning with resources that are too big for the job.

A user can stay up-to-date in real-time with what he's spending on Amazon compute or storage, and find out precisely what resources are being deployed or where his governance is going awry.

From what it's seen so far, the company estimates that 50% of Amazon users have security issues, 30% run an outage risk and 15% under-utilization problems.

Since Newvem started offering a free beta of its just released Amazon Cloud Care healthcare service eight months ago, its top 25 customers, mostly large accounts, have upped their use of the Amazon cloud anywhere from 3x to a whopping 70x.

It claims it tracked $200 million worth of EC2 spend on over 125.000 EC2 instances in the last 10 months.

It's been moving big customers over to paid services since December. Most of them are reportedly quite willing to dig into their jeans and Newvem claims it's "blowing out its forecasts."

Paid accounts get a premium service that goes deeper into what's going on in their Amazon installations and lets them decide things like whether to stay with variable on-demand pricing or go to a fixed schedule of reserved instances and pinpoints exactly which servers are giving them a problem, recommending how to solve strategic irregularities and align best practices with business activities.

The free services are still on offer. Reports on cost, security, availability and utilization will be e-mailed or can be had through iPhone and iPad apps.

Newvem says Amazon doesn't provide any of this kind of information, only a horizontal view. Users, it says, want a more granular picture of what's going on divided up by functions like sales, marketing and development and are starting to institutionalize control over their Amazon bills.

Large Newvem accounts are supposed to pay a penny an hour per resource tracked unless they cut an enterprise license. The company has also created "buckets," so to speak, for price-sensitive SMBs that may pay, perhaps, $500, $750 or $1,000 a month depending on the hours used.

All the tracking is done directly on the Amazon cloud, a policy Newvem intends to duplicate when it moves to other clouds later this year. It figures its widgetry should run native on whatever it's tracking. Its software requires no implementation and is reportedly non-invasive.

Although Newvem's focus is on EC2, Amazon's compute, to mirror customer concerns, it also has a premium module that tracks S3 storage objects and can advise users what to move to cheaper storage like Amazon Reduced Redundancy Storage (RRS) or the still cheaper Glacier.

It can track cloud vitals daily, weekly, monthly and month-to-date.

More Stories By Maureen O'Gara

Maureen O'Gara the most read technology reporter for the past 20 years, is the Cloud Computing and Virtualization News Desk editor of SYS-CON Media. She is the publisher of famous "Billygrams" and the editor-in-chief of "Client/Server News" for more than a decade. One of the most respected technology reporters in the business, Maureen can be reached by email at maureen(at)sys-con.com or paperboy(at)g2news.com, and by phone at 516 759-7025. Twitter: @MaureenOGara

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